Recruitment and Selection

This Chapter examines the recruitment process in depth, discussing how selection is a mutual process for both the employer and potential employee. The successful conclusion of recruitment and selection is the creation of a legally binding agreement between the employer and the employee, setting out the rights, obligations and expectations of both parties.

Recruitment is about capturing and understanding all activities directed at locating potential employees, understanding what needs to be done to attract applications from suitable candidates. Recruitment methodologies must be legal, fair and ethical whilst also being efficient and cost effective. Any recruitment must being with a thorough analysis of the requirement, reducing the role to its basic components and placing it in a wider organisational context. The aim should be to consider what ‘types’ of people are needed, when are they needed and how many are required.

The Chapter discusses the importance of role profiles, which should include the terms and conditions of any appointment. Such profiles support the development of job descriptions which address the core and functional competences needed, the behaviours and standards expected and the qualifications, skills and experience necessary. In developing these key documents, the importance of requirements analysis is highlighted, which helps to ensure that information is captured in a way that supports the review and testing of subsequent applications.

In initiating recruitment, the importance of internal recruitment and employer branding is also discussed. Internal recruitment is a more cost-effective process and demonstrates how a company values its existing staff. Employer branding can also attract good quality applications from candidates likely to share the values and standards of the company.

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The importance of appropriate selection methods is addressed if a company is to maximise access to the potential talent pool available, whilst minimising the associated costs in terms of time and administration. This requires early agreement as to the selection criteria to be applied, using role profiles, job descriptions and person specifications to inform that debate. The methodology adopted must also be clearly communicated to candidates and the process must be able to identify individual differences to rank candidates. Methods include interviews, tests of personality and ability, assessment centres and job simulation. The aim must be to answer three key questions - is the candidate competent, are they motivated and will they fit in.

The need for pre-appointment processes is also highlighted such as examining references, checking role-specific requirements and confirming the candidate’s right to work. The importance of informing unsuccessful candidates is also noted, as is the necessity for effective induction processes.  Poor induction undermines retention efforts, making even the best recruitment and selection processes pointless, increasing costs and undermining corporate reputation.

The Chapter closes with an examination of diversity in recruitment and selection and how it is essential to employ the people best suited to the role(s) advertised without regard to their sex, marital status, racial origins, sexual preferences, religion, disability or age. The aim should be to allow everyone to compete for a position on equal terms.


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